Past Shohet Recipients

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Shohet Scholars: Creating Connections and Inspiring Results

The International Catacomb Society started in Boston in 1980 as an ecumenical and interfaith network of individuals passionate about the preservation of ancient Jewish and Early Christian material remains in countries around the Mediterranean. In the ensuing decades, ICS has become a major financial contributor through its Shohet Scholars Grant Program to current research in these sites.

Shohet Scholar grant recipients have excavated catacombs in Tunisia and Sicily, ancient Greek tombs in Corinth, shipwrecks in Turkey, and a venerated crypt in Cana, Galilee; they have analyzed and preserved unique ancient wall paintings in Egypt and recovered traces of polychromy on the ancient reliefs of Jewish Temple instruments decorating the Arch of Titus in Rome; they have tracked down rare material evidence of Late Antique religious practices outside the walls of churches, temples, and synagogues, and have documented how the fashions of the times reflected key attitudes toward education, philosophy, and status. And these are only a few of the dynamic and innovative projects carried out and reported on with ICS support.  A complete project list is below.

Shohet Recipients

2015
Elizabeth S. Bolman, (Temple University)
Publishing Late Roman Paintings

Bolman has directed a project that recovered magnificent secco paintings in the Red and White Monasteries near Sohag in Egypt.  She also gave a Shohet Memorial lecture at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston on the subject in 2013.

Steven Fine, (Yeshiva University)
The Arch of Titus Project

Fine contextualizes this monument, which has been and continues to be contentious in the history of Judaism and Western culture. He is also directing high-tech digital reconstructions of the polychromy of the menorah panel on the arch. Websites for the Arch of Titus Digital Restoration Project and Coursera series, "The Arch of Titus.  Rome and the Menorah."

Rosa Maria Motta (Christopher Newport University) and Davide Tanasi (Arcadia University)
Burial Practices and Funerary Rituals between the Late Roman and Early Medieval Periods in the Catacombs of St. Lucy in Syracuse (Sicily)

This project investigates the transformation of cemeterial spaces into cult places for religious practices relating to the worship of the holy relics of St. Lucy and of other holy men and women buried in the catacombs.  Press: http://studyabroad.arcadia.edu/about-us/news-publications/details/student-published-in-scholarly-journal/  and http://facultynews.cnu.edu/2015/04/archaeologist-motta-wins-catacomb-society-grant-publishes-book/

Robert Tykot (University of Southern Florida) and Kevin Salesse (Université de Bordeaux)
Quantifying the Roman diet: improving the accuracy and precision of paleodietary reconstructions by isotopic analysis

This project investigates dietary composition and variation of the ancient imperial-period Roman diet through isotopic analyses of both human and faunal remains from the catacomb of Santi Marcellino e Pietro (Rome, Lazio, central Italy) and other Italian sites.

2014
No grants were awarded in 2014.

2013
Lee M. Jefferson and Thomas McCollough (Centre College)
The Christian Veneration Complex at Khirbet Qana

Literary evidence from Christian pilgrims from the sixth century and continuing through the medieval era pointed to Khirbet Qana as the biblical Cana of Galilee. Our initial surveys of Khirbet Qana revealed plentiful evidence of human activity, particularly in Late Antiquity. The veneration cave complex that was unearthed includes material evidence that could illuminate how this complex functioned in relation to neighboring Sepphoris as well as Jerusalem. This project intends to further examin the cave complex, including the iconography and the material evidence. Khirbet Qana offers a research opportunity that holds great promise for exploring the architectural, artistic, economic, and political impact of Christian pilgrimage on Galilee in Late Antiquity and beyond.
Press on the excavations: M. Smith, "Grant gives Centre professor and his Indiana Jones-style adventure in Israel additional life" - KY Forward, July 3, 2013

2012
Arthur Urbano (Providence College)
Wisdom Made Visible: Iconography and the Fashioning of Philosophical Culture in Late Antiquity

This project is a study of the role of art and portraiture in the fashioning of late ancient philosophical culture. Through analysis of early Christian images that employ philosophical and pedagogical themes and symbols in funerary, domestic, and liturgical settings, I examine how Christian art employed, adapted, and innovated the conventions of Roman art as a mode of competition and participation in larger cultural debates surrounding education, philosophy, and status. I employ an interdisciplinary analysis that considers iconography in tandem with ancient texts and engages scholarship in the fields of religion, art history, classics, and cultural theory.  The results of A. Urbano's research are now published in: “Sizing-Up the Philosopher's Cloak: Christian Verbal and Visual Representations of the Tribon,” in Dressing Judeans and Christians in Antiquity, eds. Kristi Upson-Saia, Carly Daniel-Hughes, Alicia J. Batten. Farnham: Ashgate, 2014 and "Fashioning_Witnesses_Hebrews_and_Jews_in_Early_Christian_Art" in A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, Susan Ashbrook Harvey, Nathaniel P. DesRosiers, Shira L. Lander,  Jacqueline Z. Pastis & Daniel Ullucci, eds., Brown Judaic Studies, 358, Providence, 2015.

2011
Nicola Denzey Lewis (Brown University)
Catacomb Religion: Uncovering Ordinary Christianity in the Centuries Before and After Constantine

What did it mean to be "Christian" in the centuries before and after Constantine, in the city of Rome? A proposed book, Catacomb Religion: Uncovering Ordinary Christianity in the Centuries Before and After Constantine will present groundbreaking new research and a transdisciplinary approah to illuminate this question. Eschewing exclusively literary sources for reconstructing the concerns and activities of ordinary Christian men and women, this project involves a close examination of visual, material, and archaeological evidence from the Roman catacombs to construct a new history of Christian everyday life during the turbulent era of Christianization.  In addition to the monograph in preparation, Denzey Lewis' research on this topic is addressed in the publications: “Popular Christianity and Lived Religion in Late Antique Rome: Seeing Magic in the Catacombs,” in Locating Popular Culture in the Ancient World (ed. Lucy Grig. London: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2015), and “Reinterpreting ‘Pagans’ and ‘Christians’ from Rome’s Late Antique Mortuary Evidence,” in Pagans and Christians in Fourth-Century Rome (eds. Michele Salzman and Marianne Saghy. London: Cambridge University Press, 2015).

2011
Karen C. Britt
Eudokia: Byzantine Palestine Hath No Patron Like an Empress Scorned

The proposed project forms the research for a book manuscript that investigates the patronage of the fifth-century empress Eudokia, who spent the last twenty years of her life in Palestine, and its influence upon the many benefactions of prosperous women who lived in the region from the fifth through the seventh centuries. The imperial women of the Theodosian courts established themselves as important patrons in Constantinople as well as in the provinces. The multifaceted role played by imperial women in the Christianization of the urban space of the capital provided an exemplum for emulation by elite and prosperous non-elite women. This project examines female imperial patronage during the fourth and fifth centuries in order to determine how empresses employed their prestige and resources to create carefully constructed places for themselves in society. Using the example of imperial patronage, the next stage of the project explores how nonelite women in the provinces of Palestine and Arabia employed their donations to frame their identities, in a highly self-conscious manner, and to negotiate gender and status.

2010
No grants were awarded in 2010.

2009
Deborah Carlson (Texas A&M University)
Between Quarry and Quay: The Shipwreck at Kizilburun, Turkey

Since 2005, Deborah Carlson has been directing the excavation of a marble cargo shipwrecked off the Turkish coast in the first century B.C.E. Annual campaigns to the site have yielded over 2,000 artifacts, including ceramic shipping containers, lamps, figurines, anchors, and ritual basins and altar tables of marble, quarried on the island of Proconnesos in the Sea of Marmara. In 2008, Carlson's research determined that the ship's principal cargo--a single monumental column carved up into eight drums and capital--was destined for the Temple of Apollo at Claros. This project involves a return to the site in 2009 to complete the excavation, reported in D. N. Carlson and W. Aylward, “The Kızılburun Shipwreck and the Temple of Apollo at Claros,” American Journal of Archaeology 114.1 (2010) 145-159.

2008
John R. Levison and Jörg Frey (Seattle Pacific University)
The Historical Roots of Early Christian Pneumatology

This research project will launch five interdisciplinary research teams to answer an indispensable question about the origins of early Christian pneumatology: What are the historical roots—Greco-Roman and Jewish—of early Christian claims to the holy spirit? Each team will pair a classicist or scholar of Judaica with an expert in early Christianity, and each team will provide a unique opportunity for the mentoring of a selected junior scholar. The research outcomes will be stunning: lifelong mentor-protégé relationships, a permanent web site devoted to inspiration in Antiquity (http://www.christianpneumatology.com), an international symposium streamed on ITunes U, and a published volume of interdisciplinary articles on the historical roots of early Christian pneumatology.  Publications inspired by the project include: J. Levison, Inspired: The Holy Spirit and the Mind of Faith (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2013), and "The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity: Multidisciplinary Perspectives," in Ekstasis: Religious Experience from Antiquity to the Middle Ages 5 (eds. Jörg Frey, John R. Levison. Berlin/Boston: De Gruyter, 2014).  For additional information: http://johnrlevison.com.

2007
Susan Stevens (Randolph College)
Excavation and Analysis of an Underground Christian Burial Complex at Lamta (Tunisia) second season

The Christian complex consists of a building 5 m underground, used for burials in the 4th through 6th centuries A.D., attached to catacomb tunnels untouched since antiquity. The intact tombs of the building and tunnels are ideal for exploring the traditions and social structures of one Christian community through its burial practices. Information comes both from the many beautiful mosaic markers of the tombs, including inscriptions and even portraits of the deceased, and from the osteological remains. Since the underground complex was part of a larger 2nd-6th century cemetery, its Christian identity can be understood as part of the tapestry of Roman burial practices.

2007
Alice Christ (University of Kentucky) and Janet Tulloch (Carleton College)
Ways of Seeing in Late Antique Material Culture

This project is an interdisciplinary symposium on ways of religious seeing in late antique material culture. An international group of scholars from a range of disciplines including archaeology, art history, biblical studies, classics, history, Jewish studies, psychology, and religious studies will participate. participants' fields of expertise include ancient Near Eastern, Roman Imperial, early Christian and Byzantine, Hebrew, Syriac texts, art, artifacts, and archaeology. They will bring international training and experience to what Anthony Cutler has described "is the most important single aspect of Late Antique studies today."  A program for the symposium at the University of Kentucky in 2008 is at the link: http://archives.catacombsociety.org/ChristTulloch.html.
Conference participants: David Morgan, Sheena Rogers, Brent Plate, Patricia Cox Miller, Daria Pezzoli-Olgiati, James Francis, Roger Beck, Janet H. Tulloch, Linda Jones Hall, Anthony Cutler, Linda Wheatley-Irving, Rachel Neis, Giselle de Nie, Laura Nasrallah, Todd Penner, Daniel Sarefield, Nicola Denzey Lewis, Sharon Salvadori, Barbette Spaeth, Linda A Fuchs, Karen Britt, John Wortley, Caroline Downing, Steven Fine, Hallie Meredith-Goymour, and Kevin Uhalde.

2006
Susan Stevens (Randolph College)
Excavation of a Catacomb Church at Lamta (Tunisia)

The Christian church and burial complex at Lamta (Tunisia) is a well-preserved site sealed 5 m underground, though it is increasingly threatened by the construction of modern houses around and over it. Since the complex, probably of the 4th-5th century A.D., is connected to catacombs and hypogaea as well as a 3rd-century-A.D. Roman surface cemetery, it stands at an interface of Roman and Christian burial practice. The excavation of the site will produce new inscriptions from tomb mosaics and is likely to uncover the raison d'etre of a whole new catacomb complex. Unlike the catacombs in Rome, Carthage, and Sousse, those underlying Lamta are largely undisturbed.  Published reports on the project include: "Preliminary Report on Excavations of a Catacomb Church at Lamta, Tunisia, 8 May–16 June 2006: Dharet Slama Site 304, Leptiminus Archaeological Project" (http://www.doaks.org/research/byzantine/project-grant-reports/2006-2007/stevens) and Nejib Ben Lazreg, Susan Stevens, Lea Stirling and Jennifer Moore, "Roman and Early Christian burial complex at Leptiminus (Lamta): second notice," Journal of Roman Archaeology 19 (2006) 347-368.

2005
Joseph L. Rife (Vanderbilt University)
Death, Social Structure, and Religion in the Provincial Landscape: The Roman Cemetery at Corinthian Kenchreai, Greece

This project is the final phase of archaeological field research and study of a major Roman cemetery at Kenchreai, eastern port of Corinth, Greece. Through the examination of wall painting, inscriptions, architecture, and artifacts, funerary rituals and mortuary spaces will be reconstructed in order to understand how the social structure and religious identity of local residents changed over time with the advent of Christianity. This study employs an innovative approach to interpreting ancient cemeteries that can shed light not only on the internal complexity of Mediterranean port communities during the Empire but also on regional variabmpony in the Greek world.  The published report:  Joseph L. Rife, Melissa Moore Morison, Alix Barbet, Richard K. Dunn, Douglas H. Ubelaker and Florence Monier, "Life and Death at a Port in Roman Greece: The Kenchreai Cemetery Project, 2002-2006," in Hesperia: The Journal of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens 76.1 (Jan. - Mar., 2007) 143-181.  The project website is: http://www.kenchreai.org/.

2004
Sharon Salvadori (John Cabot University)
The Early Christian Orant: The Remaking of an Image in Late Antique Rome

The Early Christian Orant: The Remaking of an Image in Late Antique Rome is an iconographic and contextual analysis of the female orant, the single most recurrent image type in early Christian funerary art of Rome. Taking an interdisciplinary approach that incorporates recent research on gendered, religious, social, and political representations in both image and text, the meanings attributed to this figure by contemporary patrons and viewers are reexamined in order to gain a greater understanding of the early Christian funerary context and its complex semantic relationship to late antique art, specifically in the context of the visual construction of gender.
Sharon Salvadori presented a lecture on her project at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, on November 16, 2005.

2003
Laurie A. Brink, OP (University of Chicago)
Roman Burial and Memorial Practices and Earliest Christianity: Reading Texts and Inscriptions in Context

This project is a two-year interdisciplinary endeavor to investigate, read and interpret inscriptional remains and catacombs in light of early Christian texts. The goals of this project are: to study burial epitaphs and their iconography along with the art work of the catacombs, in order to investigate the particular character and emergence of early Christianity within its various religious and socio-historical contexts; and to foster an environment where scholars talk across the divide of disciplines so as to pave the way for future collaborative efforts among the next generation of scholars. Recognizing that scholars of Roman history, Christian history and the New Testament benefit from interdisciplinary academic research, dialogue and consultation, this project will  include: Rome Working Conference (June 2004)—to include site visits in Rome, its environs, and Tunisia with scholars from a variety of disciplines, and a Shohet Conference on Roman, Jewish and Christian Burials at the University of Chicago Divinity School (May 22–24, 2005; link to program).
Program participants: David Balch, John Bodel, Deborah Green, Amy Hirschfeld, Robin M. Jensen, Margaret M. Mitchell, Carolyn Osiek, Richard Saller, Susan T. Stevens, and Andrew Wallace-Hadrill
The scholars' papers that resulted from this collaborative effort have been published in Commemorating the Dead: Texts and Artifacts in Context, Studies of Roman, Jewish, and Christian Burials (eds. Laurie Brink and Deborah Green. Berlin/New York: De Gruyter, 2008).

2004 Shohet Scholar Tour: Italy and Tunisia (link)

ICS Research Grants awarded prior to the Shohet Scholars Program

2002
Dennis E. Trout (University of Missouri at Columbia)

A study of how the development of the catacombs in the fourth century contributed to the evolution of Rome's urban image in Late Antiquity and translation and commentary of Damasene epigrams in: Damasus of Rome. The Epigraphic Poetry. Oxford: 2015.

2001
Tessa Rajak (University of Reading) and Lucy Grig (University of Edinburgh)

Digitizing Greek and Roman epitaphs.

Preliminary Study of the Jewish Catacombs of the Vigna Randanini, Rome

Preliminary study of a Jewish catacomb in Rome to assess work needed to restore stable microclimate conditions within the site (supervised by the land owners, the del Gallo di Roccagiovine).

 

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